Hot Reads: The Love Song of Jonny Valentine, The Last Girlfriend of Earth, See Now Then, City of Devi

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This week’s Hot Reads are all about looking for love — on stage, through a collapsed marriage, under the threat of nuclear destruction and even in the Gowanus Canal.  The full reviews are here.

The Girl in the Photograph

A delicious read.  14433706

Despite its title, Lygia Fagundes Telles’s The Girl in The Photograph is really about three young women. They are Lia, Ana Clara, and Lorena—college girls who live in a Catholic boarding house somewhere in Brazil. The trio is bound by an intense friendship. Although Lia, Ana Clara, and Lorena can’t help thinking uncharitable things about one another from time to time, when they’re together, their connection is electric. They borrow each other’s handkerchiefs, cars, and money. They share jokes, verbal tics (“money,” is always “yenom”—Lorena thinks saying it backwards brings luck), clothes, and intimacies. They even tuck in each other’s shirttails.

Head over to Words Without Borders for the full review.

Love and Death in Miami

Picture 2The big think author panels The Takeaway did at the Miami Book Fair on death and love finally aired on Thursday and Friday and are now all online. At http://www.thetakeaway.org/loveanddeath/ there’s a neat little interactive with short bios with mini audio clips for everyone.

From top left to right: Benjamin Busch (Dust to Dust), Carol Blue (the afterward to Mortality), Deni Bechard (Cures for Hunger), Judy Goldman (Losing My Sister) and Susannah Cahalan (Brain on Fire) talked about death.

In the bottom row, left to right: Chris Beha (What Happened to Sophie Wilder), Jami Attenberg (The Middlesteins), Nina Revoyr (Wingshooter), Robert Goolrick (Heading Out to Wonderful) and Scott Hutchins (A Working Theory of Love) came together for a conversation about love.

Hot Reads: Climates, Nature Wars, She Loves Me Not, The Amistad Rebellion, Selected Letters of William Styron

This week I found a “manic pixie dream girl” in a 1928 French novel, tried to get in the head of Walter Berglund, and learned that William Styron called Dorothy Parker “my little crumpet.” Full reviews here.

Hot Reads: The News from Spain, Mr. Penumbra’s 24-Hour Bookstore, Familiar, Do the Movies Have a Future?, All Gone

The weather is crisp and the reads are hot.  Mr. Penumbra’s 24-Hour Bookstore put a smile on my face, All Gone made me thank my lucky stars, Familiar tripped me out, The News From Spain tugged at my heart and Do the Movies Have a Future? got me thinking about just how strange and tenuous cultural criticism can be in the first place.  Check out this week’s reviews for The Daily Beast.  Bonus feature: I recommended A Free Man for Newsweek’s round-up of essential new books on India.

Hot Reads: This is How You Lose Her, Surviving Survival, Seven Houses in France, The People of Forever Are Not Afraid, Hidden America

Reviews, reviews, reviews! This week’s round-up includes some real masters of fiction — Junot Diaz, Shani Boianjiu and the Basque writer Bernard Atxaga — and some inquisitive, big-hearted non-fiction craftsmen too.   The reviews are up on the Newsweek/Daily Beast site.

Hot Reads: Winter Journal, Summer Lies, Falling in Love with Joseph Smith, One Last Thing Before I Go, Penelope

Get them while they’re hot! I reviewed new books from Paul Auster, Bernhard Schlink, and Jonathan Tropper this week, as well as a wonderful debut novel from Rebecca Harrington and an unconventional memoir about Mormonism by Jane Barnes for Newsweek/The Daily Beast.

Hot Reads, All Fiction Edition: Dare Me, The Thing About Thugs, A Pimp’s Notes, In the Shadow of the Banyan, You & Me

This week’s edition of Hot Reads for The Daily Beast/Newsweek included some real gems, like In the Shadow of the Banyan by Vaddey Ratner, The Thing About Thugs by Tabish Khair, Dare Me by Megan Abbott and A Pimp’s Notes by Giorgio Faletti. There’s a sweet new landing page for Hot Reads too.

Hot Reads: Parsifal, Jack 1939, The Red Chamber, The Long Walk, Octopus

I reviewed five hot new releases out July 2nd for The Daily Beast/Newsweek: Parsifal by Jim Krusoe, Jack 1939 by Francine Mathews, The Red Chamber by Pauline Chen, The Long Walk by Brian Castner and Octopus by Guy Lawson.


A Partial History of Lost Causes

For Newsweek/The Daily Beast, I reviewed A Partial History of Lost Causes by Jennifer DuBois:

Jennifer DuBois’s debut novel opens with an epigraph from Vladimir Nabakov: “We are all doomed, but some of us are more doomed than others.” Perhaps an equally appropriate selection for this tender but sharp-edged book would have been the refrain of Elizabeth Bishop’s poem “One Art”: “The art of losing isn’t hard to master.” This is a story about learning to face loss and failure—if not with grace or composure, then at least with personal integrity.

The full review is here.  (Also, here’s what Gary Shteyngart had to say about this book: “Hilarious and heartbreaking and a triumph of the imagination. Jennifer duBois is too young to be this talented.  I wish I were her.”)